Petite Star Kurvi - DISCONTINUED

Our score

Mums' score


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In a nutshell

Suitable from birth without the need for an extra carrycot, this funky-looking pushchair gives you the versatility of a pram, rear facing and forward facing stroller in one package

  • Pros

    Versatile, stylish, good value for money, no bulky carrycot to store, available as 3-wheeler or 4-wheeler

  • Cons

    Quite bulky and hard to get into a small car or fold when on public transport

Our review

The Kurvi from Petite Star is a great-value, versatile pushchair that provides the luxury and comfort of a 3-in-1 pram, without the silly price tag.

The Kurvi is the latest pushchair from Petite Star, who already have the popular Zia and the City Bug. The brand is known for its innovation: the Zia is one of the smallest-folding strollers on the market, and the City Bug has a really unique, funky look. And the Kurvi certainly doesn’t disappoint on that score, either. The seat of the pushchair cleverly converts from a pram, in which a tiny baby can lie completely flat, to either a forward or rear facing stroller, just by folding the sides up and down. As well as making this a really versatile pushchair, it also has the added bonus that you’re not left with a bulky carrycot to store, when your baby’s outgrown it.

The Kurvi is available as either a 4-wheeler or 3-wheeler option, and has an adjustable handlebar, and multiple recline positions when the seat’s facing forwards or backwards. There’s also the option of using it as a full travel system, if you buy the Petite Star infant car seat for an extra £89.99. It comes in three colourways, all of which are very modern and eye-catching.

What we love

The Petite Star Kurvi is really good value for money. If you’re one of those parents who love the idea of a carrycot, but feel you can’t justify the price for something you’ll only use for a few weeks, then the Kurvi is the pushchair for you. It’s really versatile, as you can choose whether to use it as a pram, a rear facing stroller or a forward facing stroller, without having to pay out for extra bits or accessories.

It’s also easy to convert the Kurvi from one mode to the other – to go from rear to forward facing, there’s no need to even lift and turn the seat - you just push down the backrest and lift up the footrest. More and more mums now seem to be looking for buggies that have a rear facing option, and it’s easy to understand why: my baby just loves being able to chat and smile at me while we’re out, and I love the security of being able to see that he’s happy, and if he’s asleep or awake! 

The information leaflet says you can use the Kurvi as a pram until 6 months, and I was a bit dubious, but the pram body is really nice and long, and a lot roomier than I expected. It’s also really nice and padded when you add in the comfy pram liner, although that costs an extra £15.99. 

The Petite Star Kurvi is easy to push, and the wheels are really chunky, which means it handles well on rough terrain. It feels very light, but not flimsy, which is one complaint that you often hear about the Zia. If you’re buying the Kurvi you really want it to last from birth until the toddler years, and it feels strong enough go the distance. I also love the adjustable handle, as I’m very short and my husband is tall, so it’s hard to find a buggy that suits us both. 

The look of the Petite Star Kurvi is a definite bonus. It’s modern and stylish, and the turquoise and moonstone colourways are both sufficiently unisex, in case you need to use it for more than one child. However, there’s a hot pink option if you want to be really girly! I’ve got the blue, and get lots of jealous looks when out and about, particularly when it’s in pram-mode, as it looks really luxurious, but funky at the same time. The other pushchair I’d compare it to looks-wise is the Quinny Buzz – but if you compare the prices, there’s a dramatic difference!

What to watch out for

I tried the 3-wheel version of the Petite Star Kurvi and the back wheels are very wide, which makes it tricky to manoeuvre around small spaces and on public transport.

I also find the shopping basket difficult to get to and small - once I put the raincover in it, it’s pretty much full.

The Kurvi’s chunkiness also makes it difficult to get into a small car when folded. To get it into the boot of my VW Polo I have to take off the back wheels, which is easy to do, but a bit of a faff when you’ve got to get your baby and all your shopping into the car, too.

To fold the pushchair down, you need to completely remove the seat unit, which makes it a no-no for storing discreetly in the corner of a café, or folding down on the bus.

It’s a great pushchair for comfort if you’re out walking a lot, and as a travel system it’s great for the car as you just click the car seat on, but once your baby’s outgrown the car seat you’d soon get fed up with the hassle of using the Kurvi for car or bus journeys.

I also feel that the pram liner should be included in the price – I wouldn’t be happy about my baby sleeping in the pram for long periods without it, as it doesn’t have a proper mattress.

Who is the Petite Star Kurvi best for?

Families with a big car who do lots of walking.

MadeForMums verdict

With the ability to last from birth to toddler years, the Petite Star Kurvi offers great value for money, style and versatility. It’s easy to convert between its different modes, however it’s not so easy to fold down. It’s easy to steer on rougher terrain, but it is big and chunky, so isn’t top of the list for those with small car or who want a public transport friendly option.