Petite Star Kurvi Abstract buggy

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In a nutshell

An easy-to-push buggy that has the smart feature of a carrycot that transforms into the buggy’s seat.

  • Pros

    Rear and forward facing, handles well, easy to push, easy to use, attractive, saves on storage space as carrycot converts into the buggy seat, can become a travel system

  • Cons

    Small shopping basket, not compact when folded

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Our review

The Petite Star Kurvi Abstract has been discontinued, but if you're after an affordable travel system, click here for the best available now.

However, if you still want to get your hands on this buggy there are a few secondhand models still circulating on websites like Amazon

Petite Star were designing and manufacturing nursery products for over 50 years.  The brand was one of the most well-establihsed parenting companies in the world, but sadly it stopped making products and closed for good in 2014, we don't know why.

However, as we mentioned earlier, you can still get your hands on some Petite Star products and buggies and even spares that are floating around on the internet.

With all secondhand products there's guidelines you should check before buying

The Petite Star Kurvi Abstract is easy on the eye, as well as practical and simple to use. However, you won’t get much in the shopping basket.

Petite Star has been making own-brand products for major retailers, including Mothercare and Toys R Us, for more than five decades. In more recent times, it created its own brand – Petite Star – and the Petite Star Zia hit shelves in 2007.

The Petite Star range has increased, and 2010 saw the release of the Kurvi Match+ and then the Kurvi Abstract. The Kurvi Abstract had all the fab features of the Kurvi Match+, plus some new ones, such as air tyres, luxurious fabrics and a new aerodynamic aluminium frame.

One of the clever features of the Petite Star Kurvi Abstract is that it easily goes from pram to forward or rear facing buggy with no carrycot to store - the carrycot smartly converts into the buggy seat.

For a price tag of £375, the Kurvi Abstract buggy comes with handy accessories, including a footmuff, padded liner, raincover, apron, tyre pump, head hugger, chest pads and change bag. It’s also travel system compatible with a Petite Star car seat or a Maxi-Cosi car seat. Check out our full review of the Petite Star Kurvi Abstract travel system for more details on this. 

What we love

I was really impressed with how simple it was to put the Kurvi Abstract together. Converting the carrycot into seat mode, reclining the seat and switching the seat direction also could not be easier.

The Kurvi Abstract’s folding mechanism is good, and it can be folded with or without the seat attached. It folds by sliding two clips either side of the buggy towards you (one where you have to press a red button) before lowering it down. To unfold the buggy, you have to unfasten a red plastic clip. You can also remove the rear air tyres at the click of a button.

The buggy comes in two styles, ‘Nature’ and ‘Tribal’, catering to those seeking the understated as well as those after a statement piece. The neutral ‘Nature’ is beige with leaf print, and the bold ‘Tribal’ is black with zebra print.

The Kurvi Abstract is a joy to push. It bounces along swiftly, due to its 11.5kg weight, aerodynamic aluminium frame, front and rear suspension and air-filled rear tyres. It’s also easy to steer and handles well on all sorts of surfaces. Walking on rough terrain is fun, even with my 14kg toddler on board. The Kurvi Abstract can be pushed easily with one hand, too – great news for those with a baby in the pram and a toddler walking alongside.

The hood comes down a long way and meets the ample sturdy raincover. This raincover has a front opening so you can reach your child easily or give them some fresh air. The bottom of the footmuff is lined with plastic, which is great for dirty shoes.

The carrycot is lengthy and I’ve no doubt it would suit your baby a long time. My baby tester, 7-month-old Jonathan, went off to sleep and was so comfortable with the brilliantly padded liner and head hugger. The bumper bar may be seen to be in the way, but it’s something to hang baby toys from.

The included change bag is attractive, a good size and sits perfectly across the height adjustable handlebar.

What to watch out for

The handlebar is long, and extended or not, in carrycot mode it leaves you a long way from your baby compared to other prams. However, it needs to be this way so the design can work and the pram turn into a buggy.

The carrycot should not be used off the buggy chassis - it collapses on itself and wouldn’t be safe for your baby. Likewise, don’t use the bumper bar as a carry handle. It’s not designed to be a handle as the weight isn’t evenly distributed - when picking it up it’s heavier on one end, so it tips.

The Kurvi Abstract is large when folded and not easy to carry, which means it’s not ideal if you have a small car or regularly rely on public transport.

Most of the covers, fabrics and seating can only be sponge cleaned, so it’s not the most practical as far as washing goes.

The shopping basket, called generous on the Petite Star website, is far from that. It’s small and you could really only get your valuables and a few things for your baby in it. A load of shopping certainly won’t fit.

Who is the Petite Star Kurvi Abstract best for?

Parents who walk everywhere, after an easy-to-use option with no carrycot left to stow.  

MadeForMums verdict:

The Petite Star Kurvi Abstract has been thoughtfully designed, and the majority of features work very easily. A joy to push, the included accessories and ability to be a pram and buggy make the price tag reasonable. However, the shopping basket is tiny and the buggy doesn’t fold compactly. Aside from these issues, it’s a pushchair that’s sure to turn heads.

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