Could you pass the SATs grammar test for 11-year-olds?

The Department of Education are toughening up SATs: could you answer all these new grammar exam questions?

could-you-pass-the-sats-grammar-test-for-11-year-olds_58170

SATs tests taken by 11-year-olds (Year 6) in English schools are going to be toughened up, say the Department of Education, to make to make sure every child gets a ‘solid grounding’ in the basics of English, maths and grammar before they start secondary school.

Advertisement

The new-style exams will be rolled out in 2016 but we’ve got hold of some of the Department of Education’s new sample questions for the grammar test – and we thought it would be fun (or maybe not!) to see how us grown ups would do.

The new grammar and punctuation tests will ‘require children to identify a subordinate clause, recognise adverbials and assess the use of verbs to mark relationships of time’. Confused? Wait until you see the questions…

English grammar, punctuation and spelling sample questions: take the test

1. Circle all the determiners in the sentence below

There wasn’t much juice left in the fridge, so I bought a new bottle.

2. Circle the relative clause in the sentence below.

The blue car that was parked outside the shop was for sale.

3. Which option correctly introduces the subordinate clause in the sentence below?
Jay wanted to go to the party ______ he wasn’t feeling very well.

Options:

Furthermore

In addition

Otherwise

Even though

4. Rewrite the sentence below so that it begins with the adverbial. Use only the same words, and remember to punctuate your answer correctly.

We turned off the lights before we left.

5. In the sentence below, Dad booked the cinema tickets before he collected them.

Complete the sentence with the correct verb form.

Although Dad ______ booked the tickets, he still had to queue to collect them.

6. Which option completes the sentence below so that it uses the subjunctive mood?

I wish I ______ free to come to your party, but I am afraid I will be busy.

Options:

Were

Could be

Was

May be

7. Insert a comma in the correct place in the sentence below.

Full of enthusiasm the children entered the room at the start of their lesson.

8. Which of the sentences below uses dashes correctly?

The cake was lovely – delicious, in fact, so – I had another slice.

The cake was – lovely delicious in fact – so I had another slice.

The cake was – lovely, delicious, in fact so – I had another slice.

The cake was lovely – delicious, in fact – so I had another slice.

9. Which of the events in the sentences below is the most likely to happen?

We could go to the swimming pool today.

He can come to my party today.

She will buy some new shoes today.

They might have fish fingers for tea today.

10. Circle the word or words in the sentence below that make it a question.

“You should be in bed by now, shouldn’t you?”

Answers

1. ‘much’, ‘the, ‘a’
2. ‘that was parked outside the shop’
3. even though
4. Before we left, we turned the lights off. Also accept Before we left, we turned off the lights. Also accept answers that omit the comma after left.
5. Although Dad had booked the tickets, he still had to queue to collect them.
6. Were
7. Full of enthusiasm, the children entered the room at the start of their lesson.
8. The cake was lovely – delicious, in fact – so I had another slice.
9. She will buy some new shoes today.
10. Shouldn’t you

So how did you do? How many did you score out of 10? Do let us know in the comments below!

Advertisement

Read more: 

* David Beckham’s sons cheer on Argentina at World Cup Final

* Katie Price hosts baby shower with husband Kieran Hayler and pregnancy suits

* Kim Kardashian defends her ‘wear a blanket’ pregnancy-fashion advice

Comments

Please read our Chat guidelines.