Police stop children picking roadside flowers: did you know it’s illegal?

David Taylor's children had picked daffodils to give their gran on Mother's Day...

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A dad has seen red after the daffodils his children picked by the roadside were ‘confiscated’ by a police officer.

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He says his 2 daughters were gathering the flowers for their gran and their mum, as Mother’s Day gifts. 

And he didn’t know that picking flowers on a roadside verge was illegal.

“We were just on the way to my mum’s, and the girls asked if they could pick some flowers for their gran and mum,” David Taylor, from Nottinghamshire, told various newspapers.

But after 27 picked daffodils were apparently confiscated from his 10-year-old and 5-year-old daughters by the police officer, he became angry and began filming the encounter.

(The picked flowers ended up being given to a care home nearby).

In the video, dad David can be heard saying:

“We were picking flowers for Mother’s Day, not bothering anybody. It’s public land, but this police officer decided to take them off my children.”

And when told it was a criminal offence, he replied, “Picking flowers off public land? They’re not endangered, they’re not rare.”

“I think you’re disgusting, taking flowers off children while they’re picking them.

“Haven’t you got anything better to do, rather that harassing children?”

Naturally, this story has really got people talking.

And while we’re not 100% sure if David’s got a leg to stand on (it’s not like his daughters only took a couple of flowers, and a bunch of daffs from a shop really won’t break the bank anyway), we’ve gotta admit that we didn’t really know this law existed.

Did you know…?

Under the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act, it’s illegal in the UK to:

  • pick flowers in public parks or community gardens 
  • pick flowers on National Trust property or nature reserves
  • pick flowers from roundabouts etc (which are looked after by the council) 
  • intentionally pick, uproot or destroy any wild plant without permission from the landowner or occupier.

So, lesson learned: it’s probably best to stump up for your daffs at a shop or stick to picking the flowers in your own garden ?

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