Out and about with your baby

Heading out can feel like a struggle with bag after bag of baby gear. Check out our guide to make sure you’re prepared…

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You might be used to hopping on and off a bus with nothing to hold but a stylish clutch bag, but when you’ve suddenly got a baby, buggy and changing bag to manage, ‘hopping’ anywhere isn’t really an option anymore. “Chances are you’ll be worried about manoeuvring your buggy, your baby crying or being bashed around in rush hour,” says maternity nurse Margarita Atieh (www.margaritaatieh.com). “It doesn’t need to be stressful if you plan ahead, and the more you do it, the less of an issue it becomes.”

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Have a plan

“Before you leave the house, plan your route, look at a timetable and allow yourself plenty of time to get to the stop,” advises Margarita. “Make sure you also note down several return journeys, in case you miss the one you were aiming for.”

Be organised

“You’re bound to be carrying a changing bag when you head out, so make sure you have change or a bus ticket ready in your front pocket,” advises birth and postnatal doula Lucy Symons (www.lucysymons.squarespace.com). “This way you won’t get flustered or worry about holding up the queue while you search for it.”

Manage the bus

Slings are probably the best way to carry your newborn around, but if you are using a buggy, the easiest way on and off the bus is to manoeuvre the pram backwards. You can also ask the driver when the bus stops to put the disabled ramp down for easy access. “Most people will offer you a seat,” reassures Lucy, “but if they don’t, ask for one or space for your buggy. Being polite, but firm will do the job.”

 Try this …

“Say you need space for the buggy”

Slings are perfect for your baby if you need to use public transport, but I sometimes use a buggy on busy routes, as I know Kieran is safe and secure in it. If there are a lot of people, I always ask them to move out of my way . When they see the buggy, my toddlers and all the paraphernalia they need, they normally do, as they realise I’ll only hold them up if they don’t.”

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Debra Walker, 24, from London, mum to Rianna, 5, Kairi, 2, and Kieran, 2 months.


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