Surprising phrases for ‘getting pregnant’ used around the world

In Russia it's called 'carrying a burden' and in India it can be expressed through a craving. Perhaps bun in the oven isn't so strange after all...

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Which phrase do you tend to use when talking about being pregnant? Would you say you are pregnant, you fell pregnant, you are expecting – perhaps “We’re expecting?”

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There are also those other, errr, not-so-complimentary phrases used here in the UK such as “bun in the oven”, “up the duff”, “knocked up” to name but a few.

And at MFM HQ today we were intrigued to read an article on the Babycenter website which pulls together how people say they are pregnant in different languages and different countries around the world.

France

In France they do say “fall pregnant” (tomber enciente) as we do in the UK. But they also say “se retrouver enciente” – which translates as finding yourself pregnant.

Germany

The Germans use the word  “shwanger”, which a few of us may relate to, as it derives from Middle High German meaning heavy or even clumsy. No need to point it out though, right? ?

India

Perhaps because of a sense of modesty Indian women generally don’t say they’re pregnant but tend to say instead “I’m going to be a mother'” or “There’s some good news”.

In both North and South India a woman may express her pregnancy through the fact she’s craving certain foods or spices. For example, she may say “I’m craving tamarind”.

And in the South a woman might say “I have not been bathing”. This comes from the fact that a woman is expected to bathe more when on her period. So if she isn’t bathing, it means her periods have stopped.

Russia

Here the phrase to be pregnant translates as “carrying a burden”. The slang if you got pregnant by accident is “flew in”.

Spain

The Spanish term “estoy encinta” comes from the Latin word “incincta” – which means “without girding”. It’s thought that in the past, a woman would ditch her girdles when she got pregnant so as not to restrict the growth of her unborn baby.

Fascinating stuff ?

What do you think?

Which these terms do you like – and which would you avoid? Is there one you or your family and friends use that’s not mentioned here?

Tell us in the comments below or over on Facebook – we’d love to know!

H/t: Babycenter

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