Being dry at night – 10 step plan

Help your child master night dryness with Potty Lady expert Amanda Jenner's guide

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Mastering day dryness is one thing. Mastering night dryness is quite another! It’s very natural for night dryness to take a bit longer to master. Night dryness is typically achieved between the ages of 3 and 5, but it’s not uncommon for your child to reach this stage at age 6 or 7 .

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Follow these 10 steps to make the transition to dry nights as simple and stress-free as possible:

  1. Don’t rush into night time training. It’s normally best to wait until daytime dryness has comfortably been achieved.
  2. It’s best to wait until your child has experienced a run of nights in which their nappy is dry in the morning – or at least very recently wet (you can tell this as it will be very wet and warm!).
  3. Mattresses are expensive so invest in a good quality mattress protector. Alternatively most supermarkets have plastic under sheets.
  4. Make (inevitable!) middle-of-the-night bed changes as easy as possible by having a set of clean sheets and PJs to hand. This minimises everyone’s stress.

5. Always get your child to visit the potty or toilet last thing before they go to bed. Make this central to their bedtime routine by doing it just before their bedtime story.

6. It’s worth limiting fluids just before bed but don’t cut back on drinks altogether – it’s important (especially in hot summer weather) that your child stays hydrated.

7. Consider starting night training over a weekend so there’s less worry about day tiredness if you experience a couple of disrupted nights.

8. Decide with your child what their night-time potty/toilet routine is going to be. If they need to go in the night, are they going to call for you? Visit the toilet on their own or use a potty in their room? Making it crystal clear what the routine involves will increase their confidence.

9. If your child is going to be using a toilet or visiting the bathroom it’s worth considering some nightlights for the hall to light their way. This is especially important if they’re scared of the dark.

10. Make light of any accidents (tiring though they can be!). Come out with a stock phrase: “Never mind!  These things happen. You’re doing so well.”

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Read more about Amanda Jenner, our Potty Lady expert and inventor of My Carry Potty

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